Understanding Meter Readings

/Understanding Meter Readings
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The ability of a Haz Mat Tech to extrapolate information from meters is essential for a valid hazard/risk assessment.

Meter Readings Question 1

PID readings require a conversion factor to determine actual readings?

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Meter Readings Question 2

Lower explosive limits are expressed in which denomination?

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Meter Readings Question 3

O2 is approximately what % of air?

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Meter Readings Question 4

Since air is composed of 20.9% O2 (approximately 1/5) and 78% N2, (approximately 4/5) a user should multiply a decreased reading times 5 to get an accurate measure. An oxygen sensor reading of 19.9% would indicate a 1% drop, the actual drop would be 5% in the total atmosphere.

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Meter Readings Question 5

One method a Hazardous Materials Technician can use to fully extrapolate meter readings is that they can take the Photo Ionization Detector, Oxygen and the Lower Explosive Limit sensor data, convert them all to Parts Per Million (the PID is already in PPM), in order to compare readings. This comparative analysis gives the Hazardous Materials [...]

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Meter Readings Question 6

The following conversions are useful for converting meter readings in % to PPM. 100% = 1,000,000 PPM 10% = 100,000 PPM 1% = 10,000 PPM To convert % to PPM, simply move the decimal 4 places to the right, to convert PPM to %, simply move the decimal 4 places to the left. If 1% [...]

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Meter Readings Question 7

An Oxygen reading of 20.8% is a 0.1% drop. Because O2 is 1/5 of air, multiply the 0.1% x 5 = 0.5% actual displacement in air. To convert the 0.5% to PPM multiply 0.5% x 10,000 =5,000 PPM. This is the actual displacement in the atmosphere in PPM.

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Meter Readings Question 8

Oxygen sensor indicates a 1% drop. This correlates to which of the following in PPM?

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Meter Readings Question 9

PID reads 2000 PPM of a known chemical. C.F. is 2.5. Oxygen sensor reads 20.8%. Which of the following are correct conversions to PPM?

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Meter Readings Question 10

PID reads 4,100 PPM of a known chemical. C.F. is 6.1. Oxygen sensor reads 20.4%. Which of the following are correct conversions to PPM?

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